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Many-Flowers-beautiful-nature-22639519-1240-827-1024x682WHY CHOOSING NATURE WILL ONLY ADVANCE HUMAN SOCIETIES http://sco.lt/8FyZST

LIFEWISE – April 5, 2013: We all have our opinions, principles and philosophies about life and we must be very careful about infringing on those of others. Every person should be able to follow that inner voice without external influences constantly telling them they’re wrong. However there is one choice we could all make right now that would transform our world to benefit all living things and the Earth itself.

That is, choosing nature and each other above all else. So many of us have been deschooled on this concept that it may take decades for the scales to tip so that we all start respecting our world again.

By embracing Mother Nature, we adopt the foundation of all she has to offer. We understand that she is never mistaken and will always do the right thing for Earth’s inhabitants.

Overpopulation: The Myth To End All Myths  CONTINUED … Why Choosing Nature Will Only Advance Human Societies – LifeWise

Louie Schwartzberg’s Time-Lapse Photography Celebrates Nature, Beauty and Gratitude « 2 of 14 »

From the TED page: “Nature’s beauty can be easily missed — but not through Louie Schwartzberg’s lens. His stunning time-lapse photography, accompanied by powerful words from Benedictine monk Brother David Steindl-Rast, serves as a meditation on being grateful for every day. Louie Schwartzberg is an award-winning cinematographer, director and producer who captures breathtaking images that celebrate life — revealing connections, universal rhythms, patterns and beauty. ” Click through these slides and enjoy the videos featured on each slide. They will completely make your day, maybe even your whole week. For some of them, they might even make your whole year! WATCH: 12 MOST AMAZING TIME-LAPSE VIDEOS OF STARS, LANDSCAPES AND URBAN SCENES

THICH NHAT HANH: BEYOND ENVIRONMENT: FALLING BACK IN LOVE WITH MOTHER EARTH

ZEN MASTER THICH NHAT HANH: ONLY LOVE FOR MOTHER EARTH CAN SAVE US FROM CLIMATE CHANGE

 YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE TO READ: 

>>>> “AN URGENT MEMO TO THE WORLD”

>>>> Biodiversity IS Life — Conservation,Ecosystems,Wildlife,Rivers,Water,Forests

Read the rest of this entry »

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FRACKING IN AMERICA

Fracking in America | Watch Free Documentary Online.
Energy independence. Two words that became very important in the U.S. politics. For years now, the United States has tried to lower its dependence on foreign oil for its energy needs. With stability in the Middle East in question, drilling at home has never been more attractive, but it often comes at a cost.

Natural gas extraction – fracking – is being touted as the answer. The way fracking is taking place, there are questions being asked about the process and its implications. People have been aware for decades that the rock formation known as the Marcellus Shale has natural gas trapped inside it. But it took professor Terry Engelder to figure out how much was there. And what he found shocked everyone. Watch Documentary Fracking in America | Watch Free Documentary Online.

▶  FRACKING OURSELVES INTO OBLIVION http://sco.lt/8mKlIP

ALSO READ:

Protecting The Environment is Everybody’s Duty 

For the well-being and survival of our planet and the human race

ABC Environment Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Protecting the environment is a global problem, which needs a global solution (For without nature we do not exist. pdjmoo)

If we want to manage the world for future generations, we need to define what kind of world that should be. Credit: NASA

ACHIEVING A MORE SUSTAINABLE world presupposes a worldview that considers well-being not only in terms of income, but also in terms of human security and opportunities for every person to thrive. It is worth considering what the world would look like from such a perspective.

For starters, it would be a world in which people live free from conflict over land, water, and space; and that ensures food security for the 739 million people who are hungry or malnourished today. Such a world would preserve the 20,000 species of animals and plants that face extinction, understanding their power to heal us physically and spiritually. It would draw us back from the brink of unstoppable global warming and its consequences for coastal communities, weather patterns, and, in some regions, habitability. It would protect sites of extraordinary natural beauty and inspiration. And, for future generations, it would be a world that is more sustainable than ours…. Think globally, act globally – Opinion – ABC Environment Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

Food, Ecology and Religion in the 21st Century

A THOUSAND SUNS

A Thousand Suns | Global Oneness Project.

A Thousand Suns tells the story of the Gamo Highlands of the African Rift Valley and the unique worldview held by the people of the region. This isolated area has remained remarkably intact both biologically and culturally. It is one of the most densely populated rural regions of Africa yet its people have been farming sustainably for 10,000 years. Shot in Ethiopia, New York and Kenya, the film explores the modern world’s untenable sense of separation from and superiority over nature and how the interconnected worldview of the Gamo people is fundamental in achieving long-term sustainability, both in the region and beyond.


A decade ago, Nobel Prize-winning scientist Paul Crutzen first suggested we were living in the “Anthropocene,” a new geological epoch in which humans had altered the planet. Now, in an article for Yale Environment 360, Crutzen and a coauthor explain why adopting this term could help transform the perception of our role as stewards of the Earth.

by paul j. crutzen and christian schwägerl

It’s a pity we’re still officially living in an age called the Holocene. The Anthropocene — human dominance of biological, chemical and geological processes on Earth — is already an undeniable reality. Evidence is mounting that the name change suggested by one of us more than ten years ago is overdue. It may still take some time for the scientific body in charge of naming big stretches of time in Earth’s history, the International Commission on Stratigraphy, to make up its mind about this name change. But that shouldn’t stop us from seeing and learning what it means to live in this new Anthropocene epoch, on a planet that is being anthroposized at high speed.  …. more

Living in the Anthropocene: Toward a New Global Ethos by Paul J. Crutzen and Christian Schwägerl: Yale Environment 360.

“Sebastian Copeland’s stunning photographs are a stark reminder of what we stand to lose. He has ventured to the bottom of the world and returned with a message that we cannot afford to ignore.” Sting

The fate of Antarctica foretells the fate of the Earth. For more than fifty years, research scientists have studied the frozen continent and its threatened and endangered creatures, including the chinstrap penguins, humpback whales and albatross. The stark yet fragile icy realm may sound our last warning before the impending destruction of the environment.” Check out “Trailer” and a Must See “Gallery”  Antarctica: The Global Warning..

© 2010 Daniel J. Cox/NaturalExposures.com

The Center for Biological Diversity: Warning: This video includes disturbing footage of a malnourished polar bear mother and her two cubs in western Hudson Bay, Canada. Some may choose not to watch, because it includes graphic scenes of a malnourished cub experiencing seizures. Both cubs died within two days of the November 23, 2010, filming. As difficult as the images are to watch, they show the real-life struggle polar bears face each day trying to survive on a warming planet. Malnourishment, starvation and even cannibalism have become facts of life for polar bears in western Hudson Bay and other areas. Read the rest of this entry »

The Earth has Entered a New Geological Period. Human Influence Now Dominates the State of the Planet Compounding Uncertainty for the Future

llustration: Mike Pick

In 2000, Nobel laureate Paul Crutzen and his colleague Eugene Stoermer appeared in the news bulletin of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme. In it, Crutzen and Stoermer made the case that the Holocene, the geological epoch that had held sway on Earth for the past 12,000 years, was at an end. In its place, with a start date pegged to the late 18th century commercialization of James Watt’s steam engine, was the Anthropocene, an epoch defined by the influence of humanity’s collective actions. Crutzen was an apt messenger—his Nobel came from work clarifying how the activities of a small number of people had inadvertently initiated a chain reaction that grievously damaged the globe’s protective layer of atmospheric ozone. (Read the rest of this article… Embracing the Anthropocene § SEEDMAGAZINE.COM.

‘Reduce, reuse and recycle’ is not enough

To support outer efforts towards sustainability we need to radically adjust our inner attitudes toward the material world. Relationships based on greed, over-identification with ownership, and the use of material goods to establish status and power over others, can be traded for new values and ways of living that empower a healthy and dignified relationship to all the earth’s resources.

More With Less | Global Oneness Project.

Copenhagen: Unrealistic Expectations?

Saturday, December 19, 2009

It is not the expectations that were unrealistic, but the limited time frame in which we expected such mammoth life-changing decisions to be made with global consensus.

Let us be very clear. Although much of the world has been pre-occupied with global economical woes, there will be no economy or jobs if the climate and eco-systems collapse. We have to find a way to restore the health of the planet while creating a (new) economy that works for all. And we cannot find new paradigm solutions with old paradigm models.

We are in a New World

Now that the UN Copenhagen Summit has ended with so many expectations unmet, there will be lots of recriminations, “shooting from the hip” accusations and plenty of blame going around. The World as a collective political body, cannot turn on a dime – they need time to deliberate, jockey for position and short of a major catastrophe (God Forbid) the wheels of politics and government move slowly – particularly in a democracy. It is not as if the world is going to end tomorrow – and, in their minds, the matter can be deferred while they attend to more pressing domestic issues – like the economic crisis – and their re-elections. The pressure must be kept on.

The U.N. may need restructuring for 21st Century needs, but before we slam it let’s get educated on what it is and what it can and cannot do: WHAT IS THE UNITED NATIONS: http://ow.ly/OmTP

What Was Copenhagen? About 45000 traveled to the UN climate summit in Copenhagen – the vast majority convinced of the need for a new global agreement on climate change. So why did the summit end without one – and without agreement? Read the rest of this entry »

We Are Now In Uncharted Waters

Our planet is now at the crossroads. Scientists have learned that even a little atmospheric temperature rise can initiate feedback loops that speed global warming, some of which are already taking effect. If global temperatures continue to rise at the present rate, some of these feedbacks could spiral beyond our ability to reverse them, and others may be unlocked.

Copenhagen a chance to pull world back from climate change ledge | citizen-times.com | Asheville Citizen-Times.

THE ECONOMIST:

It is all about politics. Climate change is the hardest political problem the world has ever had to deal with

The problem is not a technological one. The human race has almost all the tools it needs to continue leading much the sort of life it has been enjoying without causing a net increase in greenhouse-gas concentrations in the atmosphere. Industrial and agricultural processes can be changed. Electricity can be produced by wind, sunlight, biomass or nuclear reactors, and cars can be powered by biofuels and electricity. Biofuel engines for aircraft still need some work before they are suitable for long-haul flights, but should be available soon.

Nor is it a question of economics. Economists argue over the sums (see article), but broadly agree that greenhouse-gas emissions can be curbed without flattening the world economy.

A special report on climate change and the carbon economy: : Getting warmer | The Economist.

How do we convince our inner caveman to be greener? By the time we wake up to the threat posed by climate change, it could well be too late. And if we’re not going to make rational decisions about the future, others may have to help us to do so. London Times, United Kingdom

Climate change may be real, but its still not easy being green – Times Online.

A Global Oneness Project

What if the world embodied our highest potential? What would it look like? As the structures of modern society crumble, is it enough to respond with the same tired solutions? Or are we being called to question a set of unexamined assumptions that form the very basis of our civilization?

This 25-minute retrospective from the Global Oneness Project asks us to reflect on the state of the world and ourselves, and to listen more closely to what is being asked of us at this time of unprecedented global transformation.

The Global Oneness Project | Undergrowth.

TIME TO CONFRONT THE INVISIBLE ENEMY – CLIMATE CHANGE, THE ENVIRONMENT

Even the world’s politicians believe in global warming. But they can do little without popular support, says Michael McCarthy, The Independent.

Time to confront the invisible enemy that threatens us all – Climate Change, Environment – The Independent.

You could be forgiven for thinking it’s not happening – and there, in fact, is the heart of the problem. Climate change, according to one view the greatest threat that human civilisation has ever faced, may seem a particularly nebulous danger to many people who look around them and see no evidence whatsoever of it taking place.

2008 REVISITED

“The Hidden Battle for the World Food System”

an interview with Raj Patel – Author of “Stuffed and Starved”

How Industrialization has changed our relationship to Food and Agriculture

The Commodification of Food | Global Oneness Project.

Switching from Short-Term Profits through Exploitation

to Long-Term Stewardship of Natural Resources

PARIS (AFP) – Investing billions today to protect threatened ecosystems and dwindling biodiversity would reap trillions in savings over the long haul, according to a UN-backed report issued Friday.

More than a billion of Earth’s poorest denizens depend directly on coral reefs, forests, mangroves, aquifers and other forms of “natural capital” to eke out a living. Invest in nature now, save trillions later: study – Yahoo! News.

“Dreaming the future can create the future. We stand at the threshold of a singular opportunity in the human experiment: To re-imagine how to live on Earth in ways that honor the web of life, each other and future generations. It’s a revolution from the heart of nature — and the human heart.

“We also stand at the brink of worldwide ecological and civilizational collapse. We face a reckoning from the treacherous breach in our relationship with nature. We’ve been acting like a rock star trashing a hotel room, and it’s the morning after. But this hotel is planet Earth. The guest rules are non-negotiable. If we don’t change our ways fast, management may vote us off the island. (More.,..)

Kenny Ausubel: Dreaming the Future Can Create the Future.

Water is Now seen as a Commodity rather than a Basic Right

While some may assume that technologies often make women’s lives easier, it is rare they there are panacea for poverty, especially since water is increasingly scarce and expensive..

6.7 billion people along with wildlife, ecosystems, agriculture and industries share the less than 1% of the world’s freshwater that is potable and accessible for use. And this small amount is rapidly depleting due to climate change; increased contamination; and escalating need by people, farms and industries for daily use.

The increasing scarcity and privatization of water means a number of things for women. First, as private companies gain ownership rights to freshwater sources, women who could previously walk to them to obtain water are now being restricted from or even charged money for doing so. [3] Second, companies who purchase sources bottle the water to be sold rather than allowing local access to it, as it’s more profitable to do so. Even when companies build and make available taps to local municipalities, they sell it at costs that are prohibitively expensive, especially for poor women. [4] And since there is no substitute for water and water is absolutely necessary, without regulations, corporations can charge what they want for it, and people have no choice but to pay, if they can. (more)

via Women Need Water Rights, Not Just Technologies / Library / Issues and Analysis / Home – AWID.

 

 

“These increases in jellyfish should be a warning sign that our oceans are stressed and unhealthy,” said Lucas Brotz, a University of British Columbia researcher.

via Lowellsun.com8.

Yabbering While Planet Earth Burns

The climate crisis is not a negotiable issue and politicians must start paying attention to science.

CAN we expect decent climate policy when most of the decision-making elite are ignorant of the real scientific imperatives, or believe they can negotiate with the laws of physics and chemistry? The answer is bleak, judging by the lead-up talks to the climate summit in Copenhagen in December.

Illusions on the edge of a precipice.

cracked-earthA DIFFERENT QUESTION

If I had one thing to impart to our leaders and opinion-makers, it would be this: Start worrying instead about the fate of human civilization. The Earth will survive the assault of the modern era. The urgent question is whether the Earth will remain a place that can support a complex, interconnected global civilization like our own. We could lose far more than coastal cities and cultural treasures to extreme weather and rising seas; the ultimate stakes in this planetary gamble is the stable climate that has made civilization possible.Rising emissions could destabilize the climate to a degree that would prove devastating to agriculture.

Op-ed: The fate of our fragile civilization — The Daily Climate.

NASA

ARTICLE FROM: “The Daily Climate”

…It’s clear that we do not yet understand our own time and are seriously mistaken about the geography of the future. When future historians look back on the twentieth century, this quick visit to the moon will surely look like a minor event compared to the giant leap humanity took here on Earth. The greatest challenges of the 21st century will not be those of the space age, but rather urgent earthly ones in a new planetary era that arrived in the second half of the 20th century.”

Op-Ed: One giant leap … on Earth — The Daily Climate.

If more action is not taken to sustain these vital ecosystems, most may be lost within two decades

If more action is not taken to sustain these vital ecosystems, most may be lost within two decades

UNITED NATIONS:

In a new report released today, the agencies estimate that carbon emissions – equal to half the annual emissions of the global transport sector – are being captured and stored by marine ecosystems such as mangroves, salt marshes and seagrasses.

They add that a combination of reducing deforestation on land as well as restoring the coverage and health of these marine ecosystems could deliver up to 25 per cent of the emissions reductions needed to avoid ‘dangerous’ climate change.

via Healthy oceans new key to combating climate change, UN agencies stress.

NEW UNITED NATIONS REPORT: The economic turmoil sweeping the globe has lead to a sharp spike in hunger affecting the world’s poorest, uncovering a fragile global food system requiring urgent reform, according to a report issued today by two United Nations agencies.The combination of the food and economic crises have pushed more people into hunger, with the number of hungry expected to top 1 billion this year, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

"When they are slaughtering camels it is like throwing away the pension"

"When they are slaughtering camels it is like throwing away the pension"

The drought which has hit East Africa is wreaking havoc among the region’s pastoralists. Their herds of livestock have been decimated. Even the hardy camels are dying.

They were sitting in the sand and lying among them were dozens of emaciated goats – concave with protruding ribs.

“I had a herd of 100 goats but just in the last month 40 have died,” said Esther Ekouam, who had walked about 15km (10 miles) and had to carry her goat as it was too weak to make the journey.

“Now the children are very weak because, as the animals are dying, they are not getting enough food. This is the worst drought we have had here since 1969.”

via BBC NEWS | Africa | Drought: Kenya’s own “banking” crisis.

New York Times Magazine contributing writer Peter Maass spent eight years following the flow of oil around the world, from fields in Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Russia, Venezuela, Nigeria, and Azerbaijan to corporate boardrooms. His new book, Crude World: The Violent Twilight of Oil, uses stories from these locales to show why the lucrative resource tends to be very bad for the people who live above it.

Science Report: Climate Change Speeding Toward Irreversible Tipping Points.

With the world’s oceans absorbing six million tonnes of carbon a day, a leading oceanographer warns of eco disaster

via Arctic seas turn to acid, putting vital food chain at risk | World news | The Observer.

WASHINGTON, DC, September 25, 2009 (ENS) – The speed and scope of global warming is now overtaking even the most sobering predictions of the last report of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change, finds a new report issued by the United Nations Environment Programme, entitled “Climate Change Science Compendium 2009.”

Science Report: Climate Change Speeding Toward Irreversible Tipping Points.

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