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Humans must change behaviour to save bees, vital for food production

– UN report March 2011 – The potentially disastrous decline in bees, a vital pollinating element in food production for the growing global population, is likely to continue unless humans profoundly change their ways, from the use of insecticides to air pollution, according to a United Nations report released today.

“The way humanity manages or mismanages its nature-based assets, including pollinators, will in part define our collective future in the 21st century,” UN Environment Programme (UNEP) Executive Director Achim Steiner said. “The fact is that of the 100 crop species that provide 90 per cent of the world’s food, over 70 are pollinated by bees.”…ARTICLE CONTINUES….Humans must change behaviour to save bees, vital for food production – UN

 

-▶ BATTLE FOR THE BEES: TENS OF MILLIONS OF DYING BEES RAISE ALARM FOR HUMANS

▶   MONARCH BUTTERFLY MIGRATION PLUNGES 59%. NOW AT LOWEST LEVEL EVER

▶  GARDENERS BEWARE: DEADLY PESTICIDE ‘BEE FRIENDLY’ PRETREATED PLANTS AND SEEDS SOLD TO CONSUMERS 

OUR GMO CORNFIELDS ARE TOO QUIET – ALL LIFE CHEMICALLY EXTERMINATED – EXCEPT THE GENE-ALTERED TOXIC CORN

 

report.

SEE: List of crop plants pollinated by bees – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia http://ow.ly/cbq2F

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by Shanny Basar, Financial News 22 Jun 2012 

Nature – The Great Teacher

Michael O’Malley, vice-president of human capital at Sibson Consulting, took up beekeeping as a hobby and was surprised to find that it provided insights into his day job of advising on risk management.

WE NEED OUR BEES, ALIVE NOT DEAD

O’Malley writes in the Harvard Business Review that beehives are structured for long-term growth and as a result the pollen gatherers have become masters of risk management, unlike many “too big to fail” banks.

He writes: “When a colony gets too large, it becomes operationally unwieldy and grossly inefficient and the hive splits. Eventually, risk is spread across many hives and revenue sources in contrast to relying on one big, vulnerable “super-hive” for sustenance.”

Other lessons he has taken from his hobby are that queen bees do not appear to be subject to short-term quarterly pollen and nectar targets. “No queen bee is under pressure for quarterly pollen and nectar targets. The hive is only beholden to the long term. Indeed, beehives appear to underperform at times because they could collect more,” he writes.

Instead, decision-making is decentralised with individual bees empowered to take decisive action, bolstered by a “disciplined career development program”: “By the time bees are sent into the field, they are prepared — and, even then, novice foragers are frequently accompanied by veterans who show them how to efficiently and productively move among, and work, the flowers.”……More

Read O’Malley’s full article at Harvard Business Review Why bees are better risk managers than banks.

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