You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘CULTURE’ category.

WATCH

RESTORING THE EARTH – HOPE IN A CHANGING CLIMATE

climate restoration

Is it possible to rehabilitate large-scale damaged ecosystems, improve the lives of people trapped in poverty, and sequester carbon naturally? John D. Liu has proven that it is. His film, “Hope in a Changing Climate,” showcases approaches that have worked on the Loess Plateau in China, Ethiopia and Rwanda. Produced in collaboration with the Environmental Education Media Project (EEMP). http://sco.lt/7sy3CT

INDIGENOUS YASUNI ECUADOR

AND ANOTHER GREAT VIDEO TO WATCH;
“INTO THE HEART OF THE ECUADOR’S YASUNI PEOPLE” by Yale Environment 360

Few places on earth harbor as much biodiversity as the Yasuni Biosphere Reserve, a 6,500-square-mile territory in eastern Ecuador where the Amazon basin ascends into the Andes Mountains. But Yasuni also sits atop vast reserves of oil, and this rainforest wilderness, home to the indigenous Waorani people, faces intense development pressure.
In this Yale Environment 360 video, filmmaker Ryan Killackey travels into the heart of Yasuni with seven scientists and chronicles their work as they inventory the reserve’s remarkable birds, fish, animals, and plants. Through their work, the researchers hope to bolster international initiatives to preserve a large swath of this threatened land….

VIDEO: INTO THE HEART OF ECUADOR’S YASUNI: A PENDING CORPORATE OIL PLUNDER http://sco.lt/5c5Z2H

ONLY LOVE FOR MOTHER EARTH CAN SAVE US FROM CLIMATE CHANGE: SEN MASTER THICH NHAT HANH AND POPE FRANCIS SPEAK OUT  http://sco.lt/57JX0L

Nature has far-reaching roots, not least the magnificent ash tree and its European mythology. Both could be lost to die-back

The Guardian Environment – George Monbiot – 12 October 2012

Ash trees by Grange Fell near Watendlath in the Lake District National Park, Cumbria

Reading the shocking news about ash die-back, the disease that has now killed most of Denmark’s ash trees and many of those across the rest of northern Europe, I was reminded that when we lose our wildlife we lose some of our stories.

The death of a species, especially a species as significant as the ash, punches a hole not only in nature, but also in our culture.

Throughout northern Europe, the ash tree was associated in pagan thought with the guardianship of life. As Paul Kendall explains on the Trees for Life site, in the mythology of the Vikings (and several other northern peoples), an ash known as yggdrasil or the “world tree” was the scaffolding on which the universe was built…. more http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/georgemonbiot/2012/oct/12/wildlife-ash-tree-die-back

FOLLOW UP BLOG by George Monbiot : Let’s Rename The Ash Dieback ‘Cameron’s Contagion’ ” The government’s disgraceful failure to act on this disease reflects an ideological fixation with unimpeded commerce…

Unprecedented study:  Language and Culture Disappear with Ecosystem and Biodiversity Loss  http://sco.lt/8PcKsD

  VIDEO

“Ecology From The Air” – Seeing The Forests For The Trees

▶ HEALTHY ECOSYSTEMS VITAL FOR BOTH HUMAN AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH http://sco.lt/7rCeWH

 

 

The Impact of Vanishing Biodiversity on Human Health (VIDEO LINK)

Your Health has it’s own ecosystem, dependent on the greater ecosystem

– by Claudia Rowe — YES! Magazine

Our Health is Ecosystem Health: Dr. Ted Schettler, a Harvard-educated physician, frustrated by the limitations of science in combating disease, believes that finding answers to the most persistent medical challenges of our time—conditions that now threaten to overwhelm our health care system—depends on understanding the human body as a system nested within a series of other, larger systems: one’s family and community, environment, culture, and socioeconomic class, all of which affect each other. He has researched connections between poverty, iron deficiency, and lead poisoning; insecticide use, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s disease; income disparities and asthma.

He calls this new approach to medicine “the ecological paradigm of health.”

Our Health and Ecosystem Health

“Can there be any doubt that human health is enormously dependent on ecological systems that we are having a major influence on?” Schettler says. “It’s all one world. Our tendency to describe the natural world as something without humans is part of the problem.”

“It’s accepting up front that humans do not stand apart from the environment. We’re a major species, along with the mosquitoes and fish and trees and bacteria. And there are all of these wonderful interrelationships.” … continued …

Returning to a Holistic Approach to Life: Breast Cancer and Chemicals, Fresh Fruits and Vegetables vs Industrial Processed Food, Epidemic of obesity, diabetes and cancer; public health system; income inequality are all factors discussed in this article.

via Why Your Health Is Bigger Than Your Body by Claudia Rowe — YES! Magazine.

-▶  A CULTURE SEPARATED FROM NATURE CANNOT SURVIVE:  BANKRUPTING NATURE http://sco.lt/8EqAwD

– ▶ WHY CHOOSING NATURE WILL ONLY ADVANCE HUMAN SOCIETIES http://sco.lt/8BIJP7

-▶  KEEPING NATURE IN OUR FUTURE:  HEALTHY ECOSYSTEMS ESSENTIAL FOR PLANETARY SURVIVAL  http://sco.lt/99SfhJ

-▶  ECO-SPIRITUALITY: TOWARDS A VALUES-BASED ECONOMIC STRUCTURE http://sco.lt/7tcgQj

-▶ BEWARE THE AGE OF LONELINESS: MAN MUST DO MORE TO PRESERVE THE REST OF LIFE ON EARTH – EDWARD O. WILSON
http://www.economist.com/news/21589083-man-must-do-more-preserve-rest-life-earth-warns-edward-o-wilson-professor-emeritus

-▶ E.O.WILSON: PRESERVING BIODIVERSITY IS AN ETHICAL IMPERATIVE http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bill-chameides/eo-wilson-preserving-biod_b_4803125.html

-▶ HOW BIODIVERSITY COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE http://sco.lt/90Sr2n

-▶ THE SIXTH MASS EXTINCTION IS UPON US. CAN HUMANS SURVIVE? http://sco.lt/630INt

 

   WATCH

“HOME”

 Yann Arthus-Bertrand

 An Exquisite Dedication To the Stewards of Our Planet

Solutions For A Sustainable Planet

 

Via Earth Policy Institute: Adapted from World on the Edge by Lester R. Brown. Full book available online at www.earth-policy.org/books/wote.

“The archeological record indicates that civilizational collapse does not come suddenly out of the blue. Archeologists analyzing earlier civilizations talk about a decline-and-collapse scenario. Economic and social collapse was almost always preceded by a period of environmental decline….

“No previous civilization has survived the ongoing destruction of its natural supports. Nor will ours. Yet economists look at the future through a different lens. Relying heavily on economic data to measure progress, they see the near 10-fold growth in the world economy since 1950 and the associated gains in living standards as the crowning achievement of our modern civilization….More….Two Views of Our Future: Science Versus Mainstream Economics : TreeHugger.

 

 

THE SIXTH MASS EXTINCTION IS UPON US – CAN HUMANS SURVIVE?

 

VIDEO documentary on destroying cultures and languages

by forcing them to replace traditional education with Western eduction.

If you wanted to change an ancient culture in a generation, how would you do it? You would change the way it educates its children. The U.S. Government knew this in the 19th century when it forced Native American children into government boarding schools. Today, volunteers build schools in traditional societies around the world, convinced that school is the only way to a “better” life for indigenous children.

But is this true? What really happens when we replace a traditional culture’s way of learning and understanding the world with our own? Schooling the World: The White Man’s Last Burden takes a challenging, sometimes funny, ultimately deeply disturbing look at the effects of modern education on the world’s last sustainable indigenous cultures.

“Generations from now, we’ll look back and say, ‘How could we have done this kind of thing to people?”

The green revolution is a women’s revolution

Women’s agricultural empowerment is the next frontier for the global women’s movement…an unrecognized fact that 70% of the world’s farmers are women… but own less than 2% of the land. (READ MORE…)

via Earth Day: Green Revolution Can Be a Womens Revolution, Too | Womens Rights | Change.org.

In recent years, whenever natural disasters have struck, in what is increasingly becoming a globally interconnected and interdependent world, human beings have come together as an extended family in an outpouring of compassion and concern. For these brief moments of time, we leave behind the many differences that divide us to act as a species. We become Homo empathicus.

Yet, when faced with similar tragedies that are a result of human-induced behavior, rather than precipitated by natural disasters, we are often unable to muster the same collective empathic response. (read on)

Jeremy Rifkin: The Earthquake That Triggered A Global Empathic Response: What The Haitian Crisis Tells Us About Human Nature.

Office in the middle of the forest | Pictures.

Talk about environment friendly place for firms and offices. On the other hand imagine all the fresh air and peace you can get while working, no traffic, no air pollution, etc. You can surely expand your mind, creativity and motivation while working in these circumstances.

How do we convince our inner caveman to be greener? By the time we wake up to the threat posed by climate change, it could well be too late. And if we’re not going to make rational decisions about the future, others may have to help us to do so. London Times, United Kingdom

Climate change may be real, but its still not easy being green – Times Online.

Water is Now seen as a Commodity rather than a Basic Right

While some may assume that technologies often make women’s lives easier, it is rare they there are panacea for poverty, especially since water is increasingly scarce and expensive..

6.7 billion people along with wildlife, ecosystems, agriculture and industries share the less than 1% of the world’s freshwater that is potable and accessible for use. And this small amount is rapidly depleting due to climate change; increased contamination; and escalating need by people, farms and industries for daily use.

The increasing scarcity and privatization of water means a number of things for women. First, as private companies gain ownership rights to freshwater sources, women who could previously walk to them to obtain water are now being restricted from or even charged money for doing so. [3] Second, companies who purchase sources bottle the water to be sold rather than allowing local access to it, as it’s more profitable to do so. Even when companies build and make available taps to local municipalities, they sell it at costs that are prohibitively expensive, especially for poor women. [4] And since there is no substitute for water and water is absolutely necessary, without regulations, corporations can charge what they want for it, and people have no choice but to pay, if they can. (more)

via Women Need Water Rights, Not Just Technologies / Library / Issues and Analysis / Home – AWID.

Rich Foreign Countries are Buying up Big   Ahead of Anticipated Coming Food Crisis

In the last few years richer countries like China, India, South Korea, and Saudi Arabia have been buying up huge tracts of productive farmland and oil rich acres in poor countries like Tanzania, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Zambia. These deals are usually in the millions of acres and often come with 99 year lease terms.It’s modern colonialism.

Stop African farmland grab | MNN – Mother Nature Network.

In the rush to portray the perils of climate change, many other serious issues have been largely ignored. Climate change has become the poster child of environmental crises, complete with its own celebrities and campaigners. But is it so serious that we can afford to overlook the rise of infectious disease, the collapse of fisheries, the ongoing loss of forests and biodiversity, and the depletion of global water supplies?
The Other Inconvenient Truth: The Crisis in Global Land Use by Jonathan Foley: Yale Environment 360
.

A chance to Become Human AgainPeople should use the climate change crisis as an opportunity to become human again, setting aside the addictive and self-destructive behaviour that has damaged their souls, the Archbishop of Canterbury said today.

Dr Rowan Williams, head of the Church of England and leader of the worldwide Anglican communion, told an audience at Southwark Cathedral that people had allowed themselves to become “addicted to fantasies about prosperity and growth, dreams of wealth without risk and profit without cost”.

The consequences of such a lifestyle meant the human soul was “one of the foremost casualties of environmental degradation”.

Dr Rowan Williams says climate crisis a chance to become human again | UK news | The Guardian.

Yabbering While Planet Earth Burns

The climate crisis is not a negotiable issue and politicians must start paying attention to science.

CAN we expect decent climate policy when most of the decision-making elite are ignorant of the real scientific imperatives, or believe they can negotiate with the laws of physics and chemistry? The answer is bleak, judging by the lead-up talks to the climate summit in Copenhagen in December.

Illusions on the edge of a precipice.

cracked-earthA DIFFERENT QUESTION

If I had one thing to impart to our leaders and opinion-makers, it would be this: Start worrying instead about the fate of human civilization. The Earth will survive the assault of the modern era. The urgent question is whether the Earth will remain a place that can support a complex, interconnected global civilization like our own. We could lose far more than coastal cities and cultural treasures to extreme weather and rising seas; the ultimate stakes in this planetary gamble is the stable climate that has made civilization possible.Rising emissions could destabilize the climate to a degree that would prove devastating to agriculture.

Op-ed: The fate of our fragile civilization — The Daily Climate.

"When they are slaughtering camels it is like throwing away the pension"

"When they are slaughtering camels it is like throwing away the pension"

The drought which has hit East Africa is wreaking havoc among the region’s pastoralists. Their herds of livestock have been decimated. Even the hardy camels are dying.

They were sitting in the sand and lying among them were dozens of emaciated goats – concave with protruding ribs.

“I had a herd of 100 goats but just in the last month 40 have died,” said Esther Ekouam, who had walked about 15km (10 miles) and had to carry her goat as it was too weak to make the journey.

“Now the children are very weak because, as the animals are dying, they are not getting enough food. This is the worst drought we have had here since 1969.”

via BBC NEWS | Africa | Drought: Kenya’s own “banking” crisis.

SHARE THIS BLOG

Facebook Twitter More...
 Twylah Fan Page

POSTS

Categories

Connect with world Pulse

World Pulse
%d bloggers like this: